February is Heart Month and to keep your heart healthy the dietitians at NutriFormance are helping you to reduce your sodium intake to prevent high blood pressure (and so much more) and improve overall health.

Where does all the salt come from?

  • 65% comes from supermarkets and convenience stores
  • 25% comes from restaurants
  • 10% comes from other sources
  • 3,400 milligrams is the amount of sodium that the average American consumes. 1,500 milligrams or less is the amount recommended by the AHA for ideal heart health.

1/4 teaspoon salt = 575 mg sodium 1/2 teaspoon salt = 1,150 mg sodium 3/4 teaspoon salt = 1,725 mg sodium 1 teaspoon salt = 2,300 mg sodium HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE is the leading risk factor for death in WOMEN in the United States, contributing to nearly 200,000 female deaths each year. (That’s more than five times the 42,000 annual deaths from breast cancer.)
YOUR HEALTH

Excess levels of sodium/salt may put you at risk for:

  • High Blood Pressure
  • Stroke
  • Heart Failure
  • Osteoporosis
  • Kidney Stones
  • Headaches
  • Stomach Cancer
  • Kidney Disease
  • Enlarged Heart Muscle

YOUR APPEARANCE Excess levels of sodium may cause: INCREASED WATER RETENTION, LEADING TO

  • Puffiness
  • Bloating
  • Weight Gain

Decrease these salty six (or find lower sodium alternatives) to improve your heart health

  1. Breads and Rolls – Some foods that you eat several times a day, such as bread, add up to a lot of sodium even though each serving may not seem high in sodium. Check labels to find lower-sodium varieties.
  2. Cold Cuts and Cured Meats – One 2 oz. serving, or 6 thin slices, of deli meat can contain as much as half of your daily recommended dietary sodium. Look for lower-sodium varieties of your favorite lunch meats.
  3. Pizza – A slice of pizza with several toppings can contain more than half of your daily recommended dietary sodium. Limit the cheese and add more veggies to your next slice.
  4. Poultry – Sodium levels in poultry can vary based on preparation methods. You will find a wide range of sodium in poultry products, so it is important to choose wisely.
  5. Soup – Sodium in one cup of canned soup can range from 100 to as much as 940 milligrams – more than half your daily recommended intake. Check the labels to find lower sodium varieties.
  6. Sandwiches – a sandwich or burger from a fast food restaurant can contain more than 100 percent of your daily suggested dietary sodium. Try half a sandwich with a side salad instead.

More information at heart.org/sodium and the American Heart Association