sodium

18 06, 2015

Salt Solutions

June 18th, 2015|Nutrition|Comments Off on Salt Solutions

Enhance Flavor with Herbs & Spices vs. Salt

Salty Recommendations

Current dietary recommendations limit sodium to 2,300 milligrams per day for both men and women. However the average American is used to eating upwards of 3,400 milligrams per day. For those at risk for heart disease, which includes people over 50 years old and anyone with high blood pressure, diabetes or chronic kidney disease, the sodium limit is 1,500 milligrams or 1.5 grams per day.

Salty Fact

One teaspoon of salt is equivalent to 2,300 milligrams of sodium. It doesn’t sound like much, but that’s actually enough to meet the daily recommendation for sodium!

Your Low Sodium Playbook

Practice low-sodium cooking- cooking your own meals is one of the best ways to control the amount of sodium in your food. When preparing your own foods, follow some of these tricks to keep your meal as low in sodium as possible:

  • Rinse all canned beans and vegetables under cold water before cooking with them
  • Hold the salt, and season with herbs and spices instead
  • Rosemary, oregano, basil, cayenne pepper, paprika, ginger, garlic, black pepper, chili powder, lemon zest, etc are just some of the inspiring ways to add flavor without upping sodium
  • Use citrus juice and vinegars in place of slat in sauces and marinades
  • When baking, add less baking soda or baking powder since these rising agents contain a fair amount of sodium

Common Spices & What They Can Be Used In

Basil: Pesto, salads, sauces, meats, fish and soups. Pairs well with carrots, eggplant, potatoes, squash, spinach and tomatoes

Bay: Use in soups, sauces or pickling solutions. Add to marinade solutions for meat or fish

Cayenne: Used frequently in Cajun, Creole, Spanish, Mexican, Szechuan, Thai and East Indian Recipes.

Cinnamon: Versatile spice that complements a wide variety of foods and other spices. Works well with poultry, in curries and with fruit, particularly apples and pears. Add to casseroles or eggplant, squash and carrot dishes.

Coriander- leaf or seed (Cilantro): Combines nicely with beets, onions, potatoes and lentils. Add to salads, salsas, soups, stews, curries and rice dishes.

Cumin: Complements chicken, lamb, beans, lentils, vegetables and rice dishes. Excellent in carrot or cabbage dishes.

Dill: Combines well with fruits, vegetables, fish, egg and poultry. Should be added to the end of cooking time, since heat can destroy its delicate flavor

Fennel: Salads, soups, fish and vegetable dishes. Also complements rice, potatoes, tomato, egg and apple dishes.

Ginger: Curries, stews and stir-fries. Complements poultry.

Mint: Use fresh in salads, marinated vegetables, legumes or tomato based soups or stews. Also good in dips, dressings, yogurt or lamb dishes.

Nutmeg: Can be used in either sweet or savory dishes, including pasta sauces, cheese dishes, cake or milk (or milk alternative) puddings.

Oregano: Used in many Mediterranean dishes. Excellent in tomato based sauces and stews. Complements, chicken, fish and meat dishes.

Parsley: Soups, salads, sauces and casseroles. Use with any vegetable, potato or grain dish.

Rosemary: Marinades, vegetables, chicken and fish dishes. Complements roast meats, especially lamb and chicken.

Sage: As a flavoring for stuffing, good with vegetables, cheese and meat dishes, especially pork, game and liver.

Tarragon:  Soups, salads fish, chicken and egg dishes, Also good with raw or cooked tomato dishes. Complements, peas, potatoes, broccoli, carrot and asparagus.

Thyme: Used to make bouquet garnish with parsley and bay. Add to stocks, marinades, sups and casseroles. Good with fish, vegetable and game dishes.

Some Helpful Tips:

  • You can grow herbs in small window boxes or pots and place them on your window-sill, patio or balcony ready to add to dishes you are preparing
  • Citrus fruit juices such as lemon and limes will add a great zesty flavor to fish, chicken and pork – use the grated rind for even more flavor and texture
  •  Remove the salt-shaker from the table or fill it with herbs and spices instead of salt

 Use the following recipe to fill your salt-shaker:

  • 2 tbsp black pepper
  • 1 tbsp cayenne pepper
  • 1 tbsp paprika
  • 1 tbsp onion powder
  • 1 tbsp garlic powder
  • 1 bay leaf, ground

 

For further questions or to schedule an appointment, contact Jamie at

jamiec@NutriFormance.com

21 01, 2015

Happy Hearts – Sodium Quiz

January 21st, 2015|Nutrition|Comments Off on Happy Hearts – Sodium Quiz

  1. Does your body need sodium?                                                                                         Yes or no?
  2. Is there a direct relationship between sodium intake and blood pressure?          Yes or no?
  3. Does most of the sodium that Americans eat come from salt added at the table?Yes or no?
  4. AHA believes that most healthy Americans should eat less than 1,500 mg of sodium a day. How much sodium, on average, do you think Americans ages 2 and older are getting?                                                                                                                  (A)1500mg (B) 2300mg (C) 3500mg(D) 5000mg
  5. Which of these foods is NOT one of the top three sources of sodium in Americans’ diets?                                                                                                                                              (A)Bread&rolls (B) Pizza (C) Cured meat& cold cuts (D) Chips&pretzels
  6. Are kosher salt and sea salt lower-sodium alternatives to table salt?                     Yes or no?
  7. Do some over-the-counter and prescription medicines contain sodium?             Yes or no?
  8. My blood pressure is normal.  Do I need to watch how much sodium I eat?         Yes or no?
  9. Can taste preferences really change to favor foods with less sodium?                    Yes or no?
  10. Which of the following ingredients can you use to replace some or all of the salt when cooking?                                                                                                                     (A)Citrus juice, such as lemons and limes (B) Vinegar, such as balsamic (C) Herbs and Spices (D) All of the above

See more at: http://sodiumbreakup.heart.org/test-your-knowledge/#sthash.2Ohf3jpI.dpuf


 

Sodium Quiz: Answer Sheet

 

  1. Yes. Sodium is an essential nutrient that controls blood pressure and helps your nerves and muscles work properly. You need the right amount — but not too much — to stay healthy.
  2. Yes. Sodium helps regulate fluids and blood pressure. Too much makes your body retain water, which puts an extra burden on your heart and blood vessels. Reducing the amount of sodium in your diet can help you keep your blood pressure at a healthy level.
  3. No. About 75 percent of dietary sodium comes from processed foods. Salt added at the table makes up about 6 percent
  4. (C) More than 3,400 mg. Many foods you find at the store have a lot of sodium. Different brands of the same food often have different sodium amounts, so compare nutrition labels and choose the product with the least amount of sodium you can find in your store. Instead of seasoning your food with salt, try using citrus juices, vinegars, or herbs and spices. When eating out, check restaurant websites for nutrition information, including the sodium content of foods. You can also ask your server to help you find foods on the menu that have less sodium, or ask for your dish to be prepared without added salt.
  5. (B) Chips and pretzels. The top three sources of dietary sodium are breads and rolls, cured meats and cold cuts, and pizza. To cut down on sodium, read the labels on prepared and packaged foods. Look for words like “salt” (which is sodium chloride), “soda” and “sodium” (it might appear as an ingredient such as sodium nitrate, sodium citrate, monosodium glutamate [MSG], or sodium benzoate). Lots of foods have sodium, even those that don’t taste salty. The total sodium shown on the Nutrition Facts label includes the sodium from salt, plus the sodium from any other sodium-containing ingredient in the product.
  6. No. Table salt, kosher salt and most sea salts contain about 40% sodium. Kosher salts and sea salts come in different textures and flavors but usually contain about the same amount of sodium by weight as table salt. Some varieties of sea salt may claim to have less sodium. You can check the Nutrition Facts label to compare how a given sea salt product compares to table salt, which has about 575 mg/sodium per ¼ teaspoon.
  7.  Yes. Some over-the-counter and prescription medications have high levels of sodium. Look at the ingredient list and warning statement to see if the product has sodium. A statement of sodium content must appear on labels of antacids containing 5 milligrams or more per dosage unit. For prescription drugs, you may not be able to tell if it has sodium by looking at the bottle. If in doubt, ask your doctor or pharmacist if the medication is OK for you.
  8. Yes. Even for people who don’t have high blood pressure, eating less sodium can make a big difference in controlling your blood pressure as you age. About 90 percent of American adults are expected to develop high blood pressure over their lifetimes! Cutting back on your sodium now can also reduce your risk of developing other conditions, like kidney disease, associated with eating too much sodium.
  9. Yes. As you begin to cut the sodium you eat, your taste preferences can change so that you begin to prefer foods with less sodium. Foods that used to taste just right may begin to taste too salty. And, you will begin to enjoy the true flavor of foods.
  10. (D) All of the above. There is a rich world of creative and flavorful alternatives to salt. When you’re cooking at home, experiment with herbs, spices, vinegars, and citrus juices. Remember to check the labels, because some herb and spice blends may contain sodium.

1-4 correct answers:  Uh oh! Is too much salt breaking your heart? You may need to re-evaluate your relationship!

5-8 correct answers: Pretty good, but there’s room for improvement. Take a look at how too much sodium may be causing unnecessary heartbreak in your life!

9-10 correct answers:  Awesome! You’ve definitely got the upper hand in this relationship!

21 01, 2015

Happy Hearts

January 21st, 2015|Nutrition|2 Comments

February is Heart Month and to keep your heart healthy the dietitians at NutriFormance are helping you to reduce your sodium intake to prevent high blood pressure (and so much more) and improve overall health.

Where does all the salt come from?

  • 65% comes from supermarkets and convenience stores
  • 25% comes from restaurants
  • 10% comes from other sources
  • 3,400 milligrams is the amount of sodium that the average American consumes. 1,500 milligrams or less is the amount recommended by the AHA for ideal heart health.

1/4 teaspoon salt = 575 mg sodium 1/2 teaspoon salt = 1,150 mg sodium 3/4 teaspoon salt = 1,725 mg sodium 1 teaspoon salt = 2,300 mg sodium HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE is the leading risk factor for death in WOMEN in the United States, contributing to nearly 200,000 female deaths each year. (That’s more than five times the 42,000 annual deaths from breast cancer.)
YOUR HEALTH

Excess levels of sodium/salt may put you at risk for:

  • High Blood Pressure
  • Stroke
  • Heart Failure
  • Osteoporosis
  • Kidney Stones
  • Headaches
  • Stomach Cancer
  • Kidney Disease
  • Enlarged Heart Muscle

YOUR APPEARANCE Excess levels of sodium may cause: INCREASED WATER RETENTION, LEADING TO

  • Puffiness
  • Bloating
  • Weight Gain

Decrease these salty six (or find lower sodium alternatives) to improve your heart health

  1. Breads and Rolls – Some foods that you eat several times a day, such as bread, add up to a lot of sodium even though each serving may not seem high in sodium. Check labels to find lower-sodium varieties.
  2. Cold Cuts and Cured Meats – One 2 oz. serving, or 6 thin slices, of deli meat can contain as much as half of your daily recommended dietary sodium. Look for lower-sodium varieties of your favorite lunch meats.
  3. Pizza – A slice of pizza with several toppings can contain more than half of your daily recommended dietary sodium. Limit the cheese and add more veggies to your next slice.
  4. Poultry – Sodium levels in poultry can vary based on preparation methods. You will find a wide range of sodium in poultry products, so it is important to choose wisely.
  5. Soup – Sodium in one cup of canned soup can range from 100 to as much as 940 milligrams – more than half your daily recommended intake. Check the labels to find lower sodium varieties.
  6. Sandwiches – a sandwich or burger from a fast food restaurant can contain more than 100 percent of your daily suggested dietary sodium. Try half a sandwich with a side salad instead.

More information at heart.org/sodium and the American Heart Association